Jessica Ledbetter

UDS-N: Wednesday sessions

Attended what I could on Wednesday but, as I said, work came first. The sessions I tried to listen in were: Provide the foundation for building web-based community applications, Internet Relay Chat (IRC) workshops, Natty Local Community (LoCo) Directory plans, and the plenary “Back to Basics.”

Summation

Ubuntu is growing. With the growth, there’s a “scaling” problem that might make it more difficult to contribute. Instead of being taken over by processes, how can we make it easier? I think that’s the meme I’ve been seeing for a few days: scaling.

Provide the foundation for building web-based communication applications

More Django! Other technologies discussed were JSON and Postgres. Since I grabbed the LoCo Directory code, I have been turned on to the wonder of using SQLite for development work. However, someone mentioned a problem with that working but going to Postres on production showed a problem. Maybe a staging area. Speaking of potential errors, what about testing? Maybe some unit tests in Python. Perhaps with a base Django application unit tests could be in there that we could extend from. I know how hard it can be to get started with unit tests. Adding more tests as you code is too.

IRC workshops

First, what’s broken? I know as someone that’s been in both the classroom and classroom-chat channels, I agree with the general consensus that things are not broken. Room for improvement? Sure!

Lernid came up again. I’ve grabbed the code from Launchpad and have started looking at it. There are a lot of bugs out there and I’m not sure where to start. Like I said before, I really don’t want to see it die but I’m no Python guru — yet. Lernid, I think, really helps make attending the sessions easier by putting the slides in one window, classroom (where the teacher’s text is shown) in another window, and the chat window where the students can ask questions and talk in another. It’s easy to find the sessions because the schedule is right there too. There’s great integration with the helper application (classroom bot) that assists in starting, ending and queuing up questions from the students.

Can you tell I like Lernid? Right. Moving on.

I think it’s easy to both attend and take a class but it could be easier. Someone mentioned not everyone uses IRC. True. Another — I really wish I knew all the voices — mentioned live video stream (ustream like Jono’s) and synced slides. Folks could see my screen as I tell them verbally and show them how to use apt-get moo. What do you think?

Also discussed was the upcoming LoCo Days. I like the idea. I could teach something after work instead of during lunch. We could also get sessions in many languages. Actually, we don’t have to wait! Anyone can schedule the classroom to teach the rest of the community.

Anyone can teach! You probably have something you can contribute. Not sure? Ask. There’s an idea in you. The rest of us can help find it!

Curious about what others have done? (Me too.) You can look through the past sessions held in the classroom. There are also various learning materials, teaching topics, and screencasts.

Learn by teaching. Or learn what you know really well by teaching!

Natty LoCo Directory Plans

Hang out in #ubuntu-locoteams and you’ll see how hard the devs work on this project. There are constantly improvements! Some of the items discussed were: time zone picking, naming conventions, venue locations, LoCos vs Ubuntu team (non-LoCo) events, and more. LoCo Directory is for Ubuntu and all derivatives including Kubuntu.

Plenary: Back to Basics

Jono Bacon, community manager for Ubuntu, talked about getting back to basics. There are over 300 teams and over 1 million people registered on the forums. It’s a big community and with that there are a lot of ways people can contribute and make Ubuntu better. Growth is great but with it can come problems. He called it a scaling problem.

Let’s say you’re new and want to contribute like I do. There’s a lot to know. Even things like how to use a wiki — which, thankfully, I knew already. What can we do to make it easier for people to access the knowledge we all have? Do the processes get in the way or help? How can we keep them as simple as possible?

Ubuntu, as he said, has to be a personal experience not a process experience. I know that I’m very glad to have met the people I have in my journey. How can we keep the personal connection and allow for scalability? The video is here on micro. I really recommend seeing it.

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